1942 DeHavilland DH82C Tiger Moth

Between 1938 to 1948, the RCAF employed more than 1,500 of these aircraft.

The first Canadian-produced Tiger Moth flew in December 1937. The majority were DH 82Cs, powered by the 140 hp DH Gipsy Major 1C engine and with enclosed cockpits, cockpit heaters, brakes and tail wheels.

A glance at the Tiger Moth in comparison with the Nieuport reveals the evolution of aircraft construction technology.  For example, the wires that rig the Nieuport became the more aerodynamic strakes on the 1930’s vintage Tiger Moth. The relatively small fin and rudder on the Nieuport evolved into an elegant and efficient tail section of the Tiger Moth.

The tail fin on de Havilland aircraft designed before 1950 has a characteristic sweep that marks the aircraft as “de Havilland.” The company took great pride in its design work and the de Havilland tail sweep is a defining feature.

The Tiger Moth is a de Havilland design from the early 1920’s. World War I was over and flying clubs were springing up all over Britain and the Commonwealth.  Clubs and individuals were looking for a safe and reliable aircraft that would sell well. They found that aircraft in the Tiger Moth.

The Tiger Moth is easy to fly but doesn’t like fools or show-offs. It has a good safety record. The aircraft is built of metal, wood, and fabric.

Important: Change of Hours & New Entry to Museum

(Oct 1st to Apr 30th)

Open Wed to Sat,  9am to 4pm daily
Closed Sun, Mon & Tues

Pre-arranged Group Tours may be available upon request on closed days.

Entry

Effective August 1, 2020, the museum no longer has street-front access. Unfortunately, due to the economic impact of Covid-19, the museum has had to move all its activities to our unit at the rear of Hangar 5. The new entrance to the museum will be via the gate at the north side of the building. Signage with contact and entrance instructions is displayed. Please check back here for updates on our progress as we reorganize the museum. As always, contact us with any questions or to schedule a visit or a flight.